Skip to content Skip to navigation

Events at CSLI

4th CSLI Workshop on Logic, Rationality & Intelligent Interaction

The purpose of this ongoing initiative is to bring together researchers interested in contacts between logic, philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, cognitive science, and economics to discuss new dimensions emerging today, such as knowledge, information, computation, and interactive agency.

The workshop continues a tradition of discussion-oriented outreach meetings aimed at fostering community across disciplines and universities, including senior and junior participants.

For detailed info please see: http://www-logic.stanford.edu/events/CSLI2015/CSLI2015.xhtml 

4th CSLI Workshop on Logic, Rationality & Intelligent Interaction

The purpose of this ongoing initiative is to bring together researchers interested in contacts between logic, philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, cognitive science, and economics to discuss new dimensions emerging today, such as knowledge, information, computation, and interactive agency.

The workshop continues a tradition of discussion-oriented outreach meetings aimed at fostering community across disciplines and universities, including senior and junior participants.

For detailed info please see: http://www-logic.stanford.edu/events/CSLI2015/CSLI2015.xhtml 

Cognition Language Workshop | Valentine Hacquard | Thurs May 28, 4pm

Valentine Hacquard, University of Maryland

Factivity: Semantics, Pragmatics, and Learnability

 

Some verbs with a sentential complement are normally factive: their use normally presupposes that the complement is true. But even these verbs, such as “know", are often used when the truth of the complement cannot be taken for granted. Certain other verbs, such as “announce”, seem to have both factive and nonfactive uses. And still others, such as “think", are cleary nonfactive, but can nevertheless be used to indirectly endorse the truth of the complement. The blur of this data raises two questions. First, what really differentiates factive from non-factive verbs? I address this question by re-examining the space of sentence-embedding verbs, and suggest that the consequential distinction is between verbs that report mental states and those that report discourse moves of conversational agents (joint work with Pranav Anand). Second, how can the factivity categories can be acquired by young children? Here I report recent findings on children’s early understanding of think and know, and discuss possible ways children might figure out these categories (joint work with Rachel Dudley and Jeff Lidz).
 

 

The Cognition & Language Workshop is a Geballe Workshop sponsored by the Stanford Humanities Center. We gratefully acknowledge the Humanities Center's support, and additional support from the Center for the Study of Language and Information and the Department of Linguistics. Organization is by Dan Lassiter (danlassiter@stanford.edu) and graduate student co-ordinator Simon Todd (sjtodd@stanford.edu). Please don't hesitate to contact us with any questions.